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IPMANAB - Page 4

  • Agama di Papua di orang AS

    Jika anda ingin mau tahu bagaimana pandangan orang USA mengenai Agama di Papua di mata orang USA silahkan klik yang berikut ini karena anda tidak akan berita walaupun dalam bahasa daerah Ok. http://silverchips.mbhs.edu/inside.php?sid=5712 dengan judul :

    Teens on a mission to spread faith

    Blazers bond with people of different cultures and reaffirm their own

     

  • While we're not looking …

    Berbicara tentang teroris, paling semua negara akan buka mata, terus bagaimana dengan perbatasan dengan Wilayah Papua. Sementara ini walaupun di wilayah Papua masih aman-aman dengan ancaman teroris siapa tahu pada suatu saat nanti ada teroris yang bersembunyi di wilayah sana. Bagaimana dengan penanganan wilayah perbatasan silahkan klik yang berikut ini karena telah diulas panjang lebar. http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/while-were-not-looking-8230/2005/10/07/1128563003615.html
     
    jiak/abou/doma 

  • Masalah HIV - AIDS PAPUA

    A tribe at the crossroad

    Veronica, 42, a mother of seven, chewed the pinang (areca nut) to make it juicy. She kept chewing, spitting out red juice once in awhile. The redder your teeth, the stronger they are, she explained with a grin, showing off her red teeth.

    One of her children, Joseph, one and half years, played with some toddlers. Running around without shoes or clothes, he was a typical Kamoro child.

    Veronica, a resident of Kokonau village, said it was a bit of a trip to reach Pigapu, where the Kamoro Kakuru, or Kamoro Festival was held.

    "In took us four days in Johnson to reach the village," she said, referring to the boat she and her family rode in.

    "At the festival were are able to dance and sing and spend the night talking with other families."

    Her children came to the festival with her, meaning they were able to skip school.

    "Only two of my children go to school now. The others already dropped out. They got bored and returned to our village to help us with our farm," she said, adding that her children studied in Timika at a boarding school.

    Kaspar Ipapitu, in his 70s, showed off a life-sized mbiikao mask and several smaller masks. It takes him months to make one mask because of all the different materials required.

    He taught his children how to make masks but they have never been able to produce the kind of refined work done by their father.

    To attend the Kakuru, the resident of Omawita village and his children spent a whole day in a boat to reach Pigapu village.

    "I think every Kamoro will try their best to make it to this event. It is a good chance to meet brothers and sisters from other villages," he said, adding that he also expected to make some money selling his masks.

    Kaspar and Veronica were just two of 4,000 people who attended the festival this year. There are about 18,000 Kamoro people in total living along the coast of the Arafura Sea.

    The Kamoro rely on fishing and the generosity of nature for their livelihoods, meaning education is not as important as for other people. Kaspar just needed to teach his children how to make mbiikao and cultivate coffee or keladi (a kind of taro).

    Veronica said her children needed to learn how to deal with nature and make use of what they had been given by God.

    No wonder that in his sermons, Timika Bishop Mgr John Philip Saklil said he frequently reminded the Kamoro of the importance of school.

    "If schools are not attended by our children, we are losing a generation. This means devastation for the Kamoro, remember this," said John, who is originally from Tual in Ambon.

    John is mostly saddened by the fact that schools -- a number of them built by the church -- are not well managed. There are not enough teachers and the curriculum is lacking.

    "When the government dissolved the school for teachers, we run out of teachers for elementary schools. People have to attend university to become teachers. But if they are university graduates, I don't think they want to be teachers. They can get other jobs with better salaries," he said.

    John also expressed his concern over the alarming number of people with HIV/AIDS in Timika and the scant attention given to this issue by the local government. He cited a figure of 600 people infected with HIV/AIDS, believing that it is just the tip of the iceberg.

    "With poor education how will people realize they have HIV/AIDS? I often tell people to be careful in their relations between man and woman, and ask the women to watch out for their men."

    "The Kamoro people are open to change and they are ready to strive for change, I believe."

    "Basically, education is the key to improve the welfare of the people, to show people they have the choice to lead better lives."

    "Yes, our church has plans to set up schools and run them ourselves. So far money is not the issue, but rather we have stumbled on the issue of permits from the government in Jakarta," he said.

    No political will

    The chief of the Kamoro tribe, Yohanis Kapiyau, said the government had not done enough for his people. "The government in Jakarta is too far from here, and local government officials can see us but they do little for us," he said.

    His main task as a tribal chief is to advise people to stay on the right track and play by the rules, so peace will prevail.

    "If we think we are not being given enough assistance by the government, we must speak to them. But I know there are rules so we have to wait. That's the rule."

    "I believe there are procedures for pursuing our aspirations. If we want independence, all we have to do is talk to the government and they will give it to us if they think independence is good for us," the former teacher said.

    What about the local government?

    Mimika Regent Klemen Tinal was a no-show at the four-day festival which was opened by Papua Governor JP Salossa and attended by staff from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

    Salossa, in his speech, told the Kamoro people "to be proud of the arts and culture they have. The local government will do its best to assist you in making your arts and culture interesting attractions to draw tourists to the area".

    It was his first visit to the area of his five-year term, which end this November. "If I can no longer serve you then I will tell my successor to make tourism their priority."

    Salossa stayed a few hours at the festival, bought several wood carvings and left Rp 300 million as a gift for the festival committee.

    The Kamoro people who packed the festival venue applauded when an elderly man said: "We are proud to see the face of our leader for the first time in person."

    With so many parties throwing around so much blame for why the Kamoro have been largely untouched by progress, PT Freeport Indonesia inevitably also comes under criticism. But, at least, the mining company sent "a father" for the Kamoro, Kal Muller.

    But Muller is not enough. He is fighting against all odds and a lack of political will by the local government -- both at the regency and provincial levels -- to assist the Kamoro.

    Muller too dreams of seeing "educated young Kamoro who type on computers but still appreciate their culture".

    The Kamoro, indeed, don't have to trade in their heritage for modern living, but they could learn to better combine the two.

    Time seems to have stopped at Pigapu village, with its lush vegetation, clean air and thick forests of mangrove along the quiet Wania River. But for how long will this be enough for the Kamoro.

    Sumber : http://www.thejakartapost.com/detailfeatures.asp?fileid=20051012.Q02&irec=1

  • Papua - Indonesia di Washington

    Indonesia: Keep Pressure on Abusive Army

    11 Oct 2005 22:50:30 GMT ----- Source: Human Rights Watch

     

    (Washington, October 11, 2005)-Indonesia's failure to reform its abusive military makes it essential for the U.S. Congress to maintain its restrictions on U.S. military assistance, Human Rights Watch said today. This week, House-Senate conferees are meeting to reconcile the annual Foreign Operations Appropriations bill and to decide whether restrictions on military aid to Indonesia should remain in place. Because of the Indonesian military's long record of abuse in places such as East Timor, Aceh and Papua, Congress in 2000 placed conditions on the Foreign Military Financing (FMF) assistance package to the Indonesian military. In fiscal year 2005, the conditions included requirements that the Indonesian government:

    • prosecute and punish members of the armed forces who have been credibly alleged to have committed gross violations of human rights or to have aided or abetted militia groups;
    • ensure cooperation by the armed forces with civilian judicial authorities and with international efforts to resolve cases of gross violations of human rights in East Timor and elsewhere; and
    • implement reforms to increase the transparency and accountability of military operations and financial management, including making publicly available audits of receipts and expenditures.

    "Because President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono was elected democratically, many now wrongly believe that Indonesia's military has been reformed," said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. "But it continues to be responsible for routine abuses, has failed to address past crimes and remains beyond effective civilian control."

    Indonesian military officers and soldiers who commit human rights violations remain largely beyond the reach of the law. No senior Indonesian officer has been held to account for war crimes and crimes against humanity in East Timor in 1999 or other serious violations elsewhere in the archipelago. In July, an appeals court overturned all convictions in the first test-case of accountability for Suharto-era crimes, the 1984 Tanjung Priok massacre that left at least 33 civilians dead. The civilian defense minister still does not have the ability to appoint, discipline or remove officers.

    Human Rights Watch called on the conferees to adopt the Senate's language for the Fiscal Year 2006 bill, which tracks most of the conditions from last year, and adds important reporting requirements to monitor credible progress on the human rights situation in Papua and Aceh, crucial to informing policymaking on Indonesia. Another Senate provision, Report on Indonesian Cooperation, section 6108, also requires a detailed report prior to the release of International Military Education and Training (IMET) for Indonesia from the Secretary of State on U.S. and Indonesian efforts to bring to justice those responsible for the ambush and murder of two U.S. citizens and an Indonesian in Papua in August 2002.

    Human Rights Watch expressed concern over recent statements by Indonesian President Yudhoyono and army chief General Endriartono Sutarto calling for the reinvigoration of the territorial command structure. The territorial command structure has, in effect, made the army an occupying force instead of focusing on national defense. Public opinion surveys in Indonesia have shown that it is deeply unpopular. Efforts to reinforce the territorial command structure serve as an alarming reminder of the failure to implement serious and structural military reform.

    Human Rights Watch also voiced concern over the largely unaddressed issue of the military's continued control of a vast network of legal and illegal businesses. While Indonesian legislation in 2004 requires all such business interests be divested by 2009, there are widespread doubts in Indonesia that this will happen. There are also fears that, if it does happen, the businesses might simply be transferred to entities controlled by senior military figures. Fanning fears of corruption, the military recently sold off shares in its private companies without notifying the authorities responsible for overseeing the transfer of military businesses. Human Rights Watch noted that financial transparency of the military's budget, as called for in the U.S. Senate proposal, must form the backbone of any serious reform effort.

    Human Rights Watch also cautioned against a simplistic response to the recent October 1, 2005 Bali bombings and other bombings in the past three years in Indonesia. Counter-terror cooperation does not justify resumption of Foreign Military Financing and export of lethal equipment. The police, long marginalized by the military, remain the key actor in counter-terror efforts. It was the police who successfully investigated the perpetrators of the October 2002 Bali bombing and other attacks. The U.S. already has numerous options available to engage with the Indonesian government, including the military, on counterterrorism.

    "This is the wrong time to let up the pressure on the Indonesian military," said Adams. "Now is the time to insist that it ends abuses against civilians, phases out the territorial structure and ends its corrupt business practices."

    Supporters of military aid argue that with direct elections of the president in 2004, the stated commitment of President Yudhoyono and Defense Minister Juwono Sudarsono to reform, and the recent peace agreement in Aceh, the problems are being solved. Yet when pressed, advocates of military aid are unable to articulate how the widely recognized systemic problem of abuse is being addressed.

    "Even supporters of the Indonesian military should realize that holding out the carrot of military assistance is the best way to help with military reform," said Adams. "Continued restrictions are needed to encourage structural and financial reform and accountability for serious human rights violations."

     

    Sumber : http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/HRW/c980515e653e845861d92a9256ae40da.htm

     

     

     

     

     

     




  • Nasib Guruku dan orangtuaku

    Jika masyarakat miskin di seluruh Indonesia diperhatikan oleh Pemerintah Pusat dan di perbantukan oleh Pemerintah Daerah bagaimana dengan nasib Para Guru dan Dosen yang terutama yang swasta di Belakang Balik Gunung Pedalman Papua, berbagai bantuan di berikan kepada masyarakat Miskin sementara nasib guru dan dosen masih terkatun-katun. Bagi saya kesejahteraan mereka mohon diperhatikan secara serius karena di pedalaman Papua merekalah tulang punggung pendidikan Papua
     
    Jiak/abou 

  • Susah Membedakan antara Masyarakat Miskin dan Kaya

    Antara kenyataan dan kegelapan  untuk membangun Propinsi Papua namun dari Pemimpin Indonesia terutama Pimpinan Pemda Tk I Papua ini seakan-akan malas tahu, sementara mereka lagi enak-enak. Kasihan yang ada di balik gunung ! Tanggung jawab siapa yah ? Orang gila seperti aku ini yah sory
     
    Jiak/abou